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ACCO.org Rated #1 Childhood Cancer Blog (out of 75)

ACCO.org Rated #1 Childhood Cancer Blog (out of 75)

Feedspot has ranked ACCO.org as the #1 Childhood Cancer blog! This is the most comprehensive list of best Childhood Cancer blogs on the internet.

The Best Childhood Cancer blogs from thousands of top Childhood Cancer blogs in the Feedspot index using search and social metrics.

These blogs are ranked based on following criteria

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts.
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review

About American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) is a non-profit charity dedicated to helping kids with cancer and their families navigate the difficult journey from cancer diagnosis through survivorship. Internationally, ACCO is the sole U.S. member of Childhood Cancer International (CCI), the largest patient-support organization for childhood cancer in the world. Here in the United States, ACCO promotes the critical importance of ensuring continued funding into new and better treatment protocols for childhood cancer.  And most importantly, ACCO is focused on the children: developing and providing educational tools for children fighting cancer and their families, empowering them in their understanding of childhood cancer and the medical decisions they must make during this difficult journey. All of ACCO’s resources are available free of charge for families coping with childhood cancer.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on the ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org , call 855.858.2226 or visit:

 

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Disease: Causes and Symptoms

What Causes Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Disease?

Generally speaking, childhood cancer, like adult cancer, is caused by the uncontrolled replication of our body’s own cells. In a healthy body, cells grow and divide only when needed to replace old or damaged cells. When cancer develops, old cells do not die and/or new cells grow when they aren’t required; as these new cells divide without stopping, they can develop into a tumor or other form of cancer.  Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma, making up approximately 6% of all childhood cancers diagnosed in the United States, is a form of cancer that usually begins in the white blood cells that the body uses to fight off viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders.

What triggers the abnormal growth and replication of white blood cells, in the case of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma? Unfortunately, scientists do not yet fully understand why some cells in a child’s body begin to replicate abnormally and cause cancer. Thus, we do not know what causes childhood Hodgkin lymphoma or most other forms of childhood cancer.

In some cases of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma, scientists believe there may be a causal link between Hodgkin lymphoma and infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Between 15% and 20% of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma also test positive for infection with EBV; that percentage is even higher in children younger than 10 years of age. In these cases, EBV genetic material has been discovered in the Reed-Sternberg cells linked to most forms of Hodgkin lymphoma. The gene changes in the Reed-Sternberg cells caused by the presence of EBV genetic material may help these cells live longer than normal, replicate abnormally quickly, and/or develop extra cytokines that may, in turn, spark further growth of the Reed-Sternberg cells.

It would not be accurate to state, however, that EBV infection “causes” childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Most children, adolescents, and young adults who contract EBV do not develop Hodgkin lymphoma and many diagnosed cases of Hodgkin lymphoma do not involve EBV infection. Thus, we do not know what triggers the development of Hodgkin lymphoma, nor do scientists fully understand the potential connection between EBV and childhood Hodgkin lymphoma.

What Are the Symptoms of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma?

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma DiseaseBecause childhood Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer of the lymph system, the most common symptom is one or more swollen lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are bean-sized collections of lymphatic tissue in the neck, armpit, chest, and groin. A lump in one of these areas that does not go away over time, gets larger, and/or spreads to additional areas of the body may be an indicator of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Swollen lymph nodes caused by Hodgkin lymphoma in children are not usually painful or uncomfortable. However, swollen lymph nodes in the chest may press on the lungs and/or trachea (windpipe), causing coughing or breathing trouble, especially when lying down.

It is important to note, however, that most swollen lymph nodes are caused by infection, not Hodgkin lymphoma, as the lymph nodes are responsible for filtering lymph in the blood responsible for fighting viruses and bacteria in the body. Swollen lymph nodes caused by infection are usually uncomfortable or painful to the touch and will resume their normal size once the infection is under control.

Other symptoms of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma include:

  • Itchy skin
  • General fatigue
  • Fever of unknown cause (unrelated to infection)
  • Unexplained weight loss/anorexia (10% of body weight within 6 months before diagnosis)
  • Night sweats

Three of these symptoms—unexplained fever, unexplained weight loss, and drenching night sweats—are classified as B symptoms and used to determine the “stage” of the disease, as well as to assign risk. Generally speaking, patients who present with B symptoms are at higher risk and therefore require a more intensive treatment protocol.

About American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) is a non-profit charity dedicated to helping kids with cancer and their families navigate the difficult journey from cancer diagnosis through survivorship. Internationally, ACCO is the sole U.S. member of Childhood Cancer International (CCI), the largest patient-support organization for childhood cancer in the world. Here in the United States, ACCO promotes the critical importance of ensuring continued funding into new and better treatment protocols for childhood cancer.  And most importantly, ACCO is focused on the children: developing and providing educational tools for children fighting cancer and their families, empowering them in their understanding of childhood cancer and the medical decisions they must make during this difficult journey. All of ACCO’s resources are available free of charge for families coping with childhood cancer.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org.

 

For additional information about childhood cancer or on the ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org , call 855.858.2226 or visit:

Brighten Gold Ribbon Hero Lexy’s Day

Brighten Lexy’s Day with a Personalized Audio Greeting!

received_10206947107822216Join together with us to show childhood cancer warrior Lexy that she has the love and support of the childhood cancer community across the country! Alexa—Lexy for short—has been fighting a persistent and aggressive brain tumor continuously for 13 years and is now facing a novel, experimental treatment designed to target intensive chemotherapy drugs directly at the tumor. In her 13 years of treatment, Lexy has experienced just about everything a childhood cancer warrior can go through. Yet because this treatment will require long periods of sedation and hospitalization and must include a potentially weaker combination of chemotherapy drugs than “usual”, Lexy and her family are nervous and anxious as she embarks on this next phase of her cancer journey.

Let’s help Lexy stay strong during this next phase of her treatment by sending her personalized audio greetings from across the country. Let her hear your voice, your words of encouragement, your expressions of support as she begins this difficult time! Let Lexy know that she and her family are never alone in their battle!

Want to participate? Simply record yourself saying some words of greeting, support, and encouragement, reading your favorite inspirational poem or song lyrics, or even singing a special song! Then you can either

Lexy’s Story: A Princess Warrior Who Refuses to Give Up!

16998060_10210814037139807_8568988354010618725_nFrom her first diagnosis at 14 months through her most recent relapse at age 14 (relapse #8, for anyone who’s counting), through dangerous surgeries and experimental treatments, Lexy continues to fight childhood cancer with awe-inspiring courage and determination. She has undergone 11 brain surgeries, participated in four clinical trials, sought treatment in five states, and been told “there is nothing more we can do”. Yet this amazing cancer warrior simply refuses to let her brain tumor—which she has named “Goomer”—win. As she puts it, “I will KICK CANCER’S BOOTY!! Hiii-Yaaaa!” *Kicks Foot*. With attitude like that, we know she can do it!

Lexy’s story began when she was just two months old and diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder called Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Occurring in only about 1 out of every 3,000 individuals, NF1 is characterized by the growth of multiple non-cancerous tumors on the skin and nerves, as well as the development of abnormal pigmentation of the skin. Unfortunately, about 15% of children diagnosed with NF1 will develop malignant brain tumors (gliomas), usually around the nerves of the eye.

1656059_793264014071648_8077044416752699676_n - CopyFor the first year of her life, Lexy progressed just like any healthy, happy child, despite the NF1 diagnosis, crawling and starting to take her first shaky steps. But just after her first birthday, her parents noticed that she had stopped trying to walk and had started to drag her left leg as she crawled. Concern turned to alarm when Lexy began clutching her left arm tightly to her chest. A trip to the pediatrician quickly turned into an emergency MRI, the results of which were devastating. A brain tumor the size of a Granny Smith apple was pressing on Lexy’s brain, causing partial paralysis on the left side.
That first year—2004—Lexy underwent two major brain surgeries to reduce the size of the tumor, visiting multiple hospitals in multiple states for critical “second opinions” when told the tumor was inoperable and untreatable. Yet after surgery, the tumor returned, larger and stronger than ever. For the next eight years, treatment developed a pattern: chemotherapy before and after surgery, with an MRI every three months showing continued growth. Each time, the chemotherapy got more intensive with greater side effects. Eventually, the family turned to clinical trials of new drugs, first in New York, then in Boston. Yet each time, “Goomer” returned, stronger than ever.

17016934_1367789259952451_8451643943963382860_oMost recently, Lexy has been participating in a clinical trial in Pittsburg focused on a vaccine-based approach. The goal of this trial is to convince the body that the tumor is an infection, with the goal of training the body to use its own white blood cells to fight the tumor. Unfortunately, after more than a year in this trial, Lexy’s most recent scans show a tumor that is stable but not shrinking. The unhappy conclusion is that the tumor is likely not going to respond to this form of treatment.

Side Effects: Long-Term Health Effects of Chemotherapy

By its very nature, chemotherapy is designed to kill cells as they grow. Because cancer cells grow more quickly than normal cells, they are more susceptible to the toxicity of the chemotherapy. Yet normal cells are affected as well, often leading to serious, long-term health problems, especially for children. In Lexy’s case, the location of the tumor, the many surgeries, and the long history of chemotherapy have taken a devastating toll on her young body.

14225563_10209150791719711_884863789674982736_nLexy suffers from partial paralysis on her left side, as a result of the tumor pressing against her brain. Lexy must walk with a splint on her left foot and has permanent paralysis of her left hand, which she calls her “Happy Hand”. At age nine, another brain surgery led to permanent and total blindness. She continues to suffer from seizures. Her kidneys no longer function properly and she suffers from permanent endocrine issues, including adrenal insufficiency, as well as hypothyroidism, meaning that her body cannot regulate temperature properly and she is cold all the time. The thyroid and endocrine issues must be compensated for by constant medication: she takes 15 medications nightly and eight in the morning in addition to the medications required to fight the brain tumor!

Relapse #8: One More Battle to be Won

Just after her 14th birthday in mid-February, Lexy and her family were given the devastating news that “Goomer” is not responding to the vaccine-based experimental therapy. Neurosurgeons across the country agree that the tumor is now inoperable. Because the tumor has engulfed the blood vessels feeding both the tumor and the brain, surgeons would be unable to differentiate between the vessels and the tumor, making the surgery exceedingly dangerous. Oncologists also agree that radiation therapy would almost certainly lead to leukemia and/or other secondary cancers due to her NF1 diagnosis.

11947867_485465818297250_7640459903540792984_oAt this time, Lexy and her family are facing another experimental treatment known as Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy. During this treatment, which would be administered in the hospital every four weeks, a custom-tailored cocktail of chemotherapy drugs will be aimed directly at the tumor through a long catheter that enters the body at the groin. This new treatment has shown some success for both adults and children, yet still presents significant challenges for Lexy and her family.

In order to design an effective (hopefully) chemotherapy regime, Lexy’s oncology team has compiled a comprehensive analysis of every single drug administered to Lexy over her 13 years of treatment to identify the ones which Lexy’s tumor has responded to in the past. Unfortunately, during a prior round of chemotherapy, Lexy had a severe and dangerous allergic reaction to one of the two drugs that is generally believed to be most effective during Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy. Therefore, Lexy must rely solely on a 40-year-old drug known as Melphalan, which, due to its extreme toxicity, is usually only administered to adults and/or older teens, or in cases of last resort. This is a dramatic example of the desperate need for development of new, less toxic treatments options specifically designed for childhood cancer and the unique needs of children’s growing bodies.

13620709_10208634596615156_6496852900457048797_nYet Lexy and her family absolutely refuse to give up and will continue to pursue every available treatment option until they find the one that finally defeats “Goomer”. As Lexy herself says, “I can’t let Goomer win!” Throughout her long fight, she has been supported by her amazing family, especially by her 17-year-old brother, Cameron, whose life, like the lives of so many childhood cancer siblings has been interrupted and disrupted as much by childhood cancer as his sister, yet who continues to stand and fight right by her side; he is Lexy’s Hero as much as she is his Hero!

Lexy’s courage and determination are truly an inspiration to us all. Thank you for speaking out about childhood cancer, for sharing your story with us, and for serving as an inspiration to other childhood cancer warriors. We know you are going to kick Goomer’s booty, Lexy! 

Please visit Lexy on her Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/Love4Lexy/

About American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) is a non-profit charity dedicated to helping kids with cancer and their families navigate the difficult journey from cancer diagnosis through survivorship. Internationally, ACCO is the sole U.S. member of Childhood Cancer International (CCI), the largest patient-support organization for childhood cancer in the world. Here in the United States, ACCO promotes the critical importance of ensuring continued funding into new and better treatment protocols for childhood cancer. And most importantly, ACCO is focused on the children: developing and providing educational tools for children fighting cancer and their families, empowering them in their understanding of childhood cancer and the medical decisions they must make during this difficult journey. All of ACCO’s resources are available free of charge for families coping with childhood cancer.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org

Gold Ribbon Hero Makahla D

“Reason this person is a Gold Ribbon Hero: Makahla is 6 years old and is fighting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. She was diagnosed on Feb 28, 2017 and has been so strong tough everything so far! She can make anyone smile even on her bad days! She’s got a long road ahead of her but she’s going to keep fighting to bet this nasty cancer!” – Ashley D

 

 

Makahla D

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Disease: A brief introduction

Image result for Childhood HodgkinChildhood Hodgkin lymphoma, similarly to adult Hodgkin lymphoma, is a type of malignant cancer of the lymph system, which forms a critical part of the immune system our bodies use to fight disease. Specifically, Hodgkin lymphoma usually begins in lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell responsible for fighting bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders. Hodgkin lymphoma makes up about 6% of all childhood cancers. Today, the prognosis for children with Hodgkin lymphoma is significantly higher than even a decade ago, with the five-year survival rate between 90-95%.

Risk Factors for Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

A “risk factor” is anything that increases the odds of developing a disease such as cancer. For example, smoking is defined as a risk factors for lung cancer. Unlike many adult cancers, childhood cancers are rarely, if ever, linked to specific risk factors, especially lifestyle choices. Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma does have several identified risk factors. It is important to note, however, that not all children with these specific risk factors develop Hodgkin lymphoma, nor can most cases of Hodgkin lymphoma be traced to these risk factors. As with all childhood cancers, the cause of Hodgkin lymphoma is unknown.

Generally speaking, infection with one of two viruses known to cause immunodeficiency—Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS, and the Epstein-Barr virus—are considered to be risk factors for childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Scientists and researchers are unclear as to why there appears to be a link between Epstein-Barr and Hodgkin lymphoma.

Other risk factors for childhood Hodgkin lymphoma include:

  • Age: Hodgkin lymphoma is more common in teens and young adults than in younger children
  • Gender: more girls than boys develop Hodgkin lymphoma during adolescence, but in young children, boys are significantly more likely to develop this form of cancer than girls
  • Family history: siblings, especially identical twins, have a slighter higher risk for Hodgkin lymphoma, although most children with Hodgkin lymphoma do not have a family history
  • Socioeconomic status: children from a higher socioeconomic background have a slighter higher risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma, although the link is unknown. Some research speculate that children from more affluent families are more likely to contract Epstein-Barr.

Can Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Prevented?

Because the development of childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma is not linked to lifestyle factors that can cause some adult cancers, there is no known way to prevent childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. The one exception relates to the potential development of Hodgkin lymphoma as a secondary cancer stemming from treatment of a different form of childhood cancer with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. However, for children battling cancer, each child’s oncology team must weigh the need for intensive treatment to fight the primary cancer with the risk of causing secondary cancers and/or other long-term health problems. As with all childhood cancers, this exception highlights the critical need to develop new, more effective, and less toxic treatment options designed specifically for kids with cancer.

About American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) is a non-profit charity dedicated to helping kids with cancer and their families navigate the difficult journey from cancer diagnosis through survivorship. Internationally, ACCO is the sole U.S. member of Childhood Cancer International (CCI), the largest patient-support organization for childhood cancer in the world. Here in the United States, ACCO promotes the critical importance of ensuring continued funding into new and better treatment protocols for childhood cancer.  And most importantly, ACCO is focused on the children: developing and providing educational tools for children fighting cancer and their families, empowering them in their understanding of childhood cancer and the medical decisions they must make during this difficult journey. All of ACCO’s resources are available free of charge for families coping with childhood cancer.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on the ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org , call 855.858.2226 or visit:

Latest data show a global increase of 13% in childhood cancer incidence over two decades

Lyon, France, 11 April 2017 – An international study coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and published today in The Lancet Oncology shows that in 2001–2010, childhood cancer was 13% more common than in the 1980s, reaching an annual incidence rate of 140 per million children aged 0–14 years worldwide. Part of this increase may be due to better, or earlier, detection of these cancers.

Based on information collected globally on almost 300 000 cancer cases diagnosed in 2001–2010, the study showed that leukaemia is the most common cancer in children younger than 15 years, making up almost a third of childhood cancer cases. Tumours of the central nervous system ranked second (20% of cases), and lymphomas accounted for 12% of cases. In children younger than 5 years, a third of the cases were embryonal tumours, such as neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, nephroblastoma, or hepatoblastoma.

Click here to read the full press release.

Gold Ribbon Hero Rainin Day

17629852_1305213216237690_2670304188138455941_nRainin’s Battle Against Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

Rainin was diagnosed with Stage 4 Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma on January 13, 2016 at the age of 6. Rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS for short, is a type of cancer that develops from skeletal muscles, or the muscles that we voluntarily control during movement (unlike the smooth and cardiac muscles of our internal organs that move involuntarily). ARMS, or Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma, is a sub-type of RMS that tends to develop in the larger muscles of the trunk, arms, or legs. The name “Alveolar” comes from the growth of smaller, rounder, and denser tumors that appear to resemble the small air sacs found in the lungs.

RMS is extremely rare, making up only about 3% of all childhood cancers. Approximately 350 children are diagnosed with RMS each year. ARMS is even rarer, occurring in only 20-25% of all RMS diagnoses. Unfortunately, ARMS is also the most aggressive form of RMS. Because it grows more quickly than other forms of RMS, it is generally considered a “high risk” form of childhood cancer. At the time of diagnosis, Rainin’s aRMS was “Stage 4”, requiring an aggressive treatment approach combining surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Rainin underwent six weeks of radiation and nine months of chemotherapy. He completed treatment in October 2016.

16797382_1259416594150686_1960588434710900247_oNo Time for Vacation: Immediate Relapse

Rainin and his family had only a short time to celebrate after his initial remission. Within a month of completing treatment, Rainin’s family was told that the tumors had metastasized (spread) to his abdomen and spine. In January, he began yet another round of intensive chemotherapy and radiation. This new round of treatment was expected to last for another nine months. By mid-February, the quickly growing tumors had begun to damage his bladder and kidneys. While initial scans showed that the chemotherapy was having some impact, it now appears that the tumors are simply growing too quickly for even intensive traditional therapy to keep up. Rainin’s family has sought alternative treatments and are still hopeful that these will lead to recovery.

Sadly, Rainin’s story is all-too-common for children diagnosed with this aggressive form of cancer. For children like Rainin with “High Risk” tumors, there is overwhelming concern about metastasis even when, as in Rainin’s case, the original tumors are controlled with traditional treatment. Oncologists and researchers continue to search for novel treatment approaches that will more successfully reduce the occurrence of relapse and more effectively target the new tumors once they do appear.

Raining’s family was told that their only option currently is palliative care undergoing radiation therapy, which at the very least has improved his kidney function, but his family has sought alternatives and is hopeful that Rainin will recover and one day be cancer free! We ask you to join with us in sending Rainin and his family courage, strength, and prayers in this most difficult time. Rainin is truly a childhood cancer warrior and a Gold Ribbon Hero.

17458326_1294113937347618_8703095765743266482_nHelp Rainin Take a Vacation!

We would like to take a few minutes today to ask you to help send Gold Ribbon Hero Rainin on a “virtual vacation”! Rainin, a seven-year-old boy from Washington State, has been bravely battling Stage 4 Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS) since January 2016. Rainin’s aRMS relapsed in November and he began a second round of radiation and chemotherapy in January 2017. Although Rainin’s oncology team now believes that the tumors growing in his back and spine are not responding to treatment and palliative radiation has helped restore his kidney function, Rainin’s treatment options are very limited at this time, but his family has started alternative treatments hopeful for Rainin’s recovery!

Raining would love nothing more than to travel the world and currently, with your help he can still use his imagination to visit special places around the world. Can you help? Help Rainin enjoy a “virtual vacation” by sending him pictures and postcards of special places you have visited! Choose your favorite place or send Rainin to several places around the world: the choice is yours!

To email your pictures, please send them to cperry@americanchildhoodcancer.org or post them to our Facebook page using the hashtag #Rainin’sVacation.

To mail Rainin a postcard, please address it to:

Rainin Day
2908 E 27th Street
Vancouver Washington 98661

About American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) is a non-profit charity dedicated to helping kids with cancer and their families navigate the difficult journey from cancer diagnosis through survivorship. Internationally, ACCO is the sole U.S. member of Childhood Cancer International (CCI), the largest patient-support organization for childhood cancer in the world. Here in the United States, ACCO promotes the critical importance of ensuring continued funding into new and better treatment protocols for childhood cancer.  And most importantly, ACCO is focused on the children: developing and providing educational tools for children fighting cancer and their families, empowering them in their understanding of childhood cancer and the medical decisions they must make during this difficult journey. All of ACCO’s resources are available free of charge for families coping with childhood cancer.

For additional information about childhood cancer or on ACCO, or to order resources for you or your child, please visit our website at www.acco.org.

Gold Ribbon Hero Jayce S

Reason this person is a Gold Ribbon Hero: My Son Is A Gold Ribbon Hero Because At One Years Old He Is Fighting Cancer. For Two Months Back And Fourth To The Hospital And Getting Sicker And Sicker We Didn’t Know What Was Wrong With Him. Week Or Less He Could Have Been Knocking On Deaths Door To Poor Medical Care At One Hospital But Now We Are At Golisano Children’s Hospital And My One Year Old Baby Is Fighting Back Aganist His Cancer And Gained His Ablilty To Walk Again After Three Months Of Not Being Able To And Now He Has Pushed Himself To Walk Again. He Is His Mommy’s Hero. He’s A Fighter And So Strong Even Through All The Pain He Has A Spirit That Will Melt Your Heart So Precious And Sweet. His Strength For Being So Little Is Remarkable ️ He’s Truly Am Amazing Baby And He’s My Hero” – Cheyenne K

Jayce S

Gold Ribbon Hero Jene S

“Reason this person is a Gold Ribbon Hero: I first met Jenne almost two years ago, right after our daughter was diagnosed with Leukemia.  She was the first chemo mama that I met and we had an instant bond.  She took me under her wing and held my hand during some of my hardest hours.  She never gave up on our fight despite being in the middle of fighting for her own daughter who has neuroblastoma.  We dreamed of our girls growing up with the bond that only peds oncology patients can have but we recently learned that Jenne’s daughter, Alanna, has relapsed and only has a few weeks left to live.  Jenne’s bravery through their entire fight has inspired so many families who are treated in our clinic.  She is the epitome of grace, strength, and compassion.  She has fought day and night for her daughter and continues to support so many of us who are in the middle of our own cancer battles.  Jenne inspires so many and I would love nothing more than for her to be honored during this difficult time in her family’s story.  Her daughter is leaving behind such an amazing legacy and it’s in part because of the mother who raised and supported her.  Jenne is my gold ribbon hero!  The picture I have included is from the day that Alanna was able to ring the “no more chemo” bell when she was discharged from the hospital after her last treatment, circa February, 2016.” – Jenica Lawrence

Jene S

Gold Ribbon Hero Megan C

“Reason this person is a Gold Ribbon Hero: When Megan was 14 years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer. They found a immature tatratoma with yolk sac carcinoma arising from her right ovary. It grew so big that it engulfed her right ovary and part of her Fallopian tube. They tried to remove the tumor along with her ovary and Fallopian tube with hopes of removing the cancer along with it. Unfortunately, during an extensive 6 hour surgery they realized the tumor had ruptured and had been leaking into her abodes for over a week. They were going to remove everything giving her a hysterectomy at 14 but decided that she was to young. On May 9 2007 doctors called after testing the tumor to confirm what we had already known. She had cancer. Megan was so strong and agreed to have a study test of chemotherapy that gave her more chemo in a shorter amount of time. She just kept saying she “wanted to save the world, or save someone from going through what she did”. She was treated at A.I Dupont Hospital for Children in Wilmington Delaware. She would go in for treatment for 4 days and then 1 day of liquids. Then she would come home for 3 weeks and then repeat. It was announced she was in remission on July 14, 2007. During her treatment process she held it together so well, I was amazed at how strong my little girl was. Fighting like a super hero. She is now 24 and July 14 of this year will be 10 years in remission. She is struggling with After affects of the chemo but she’s working through them. Unfortunately, she won’t be able to have children naturally which is her life long dream to be a mommy but we are figuring it out some how.” – Dorothy C

 

 

 

Megan C