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ACCO Celebrates Year THREE with Giant in the Community Bag Program

ACCO Celebrates Year THREE with Giant in the Community Bag Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Beltsville, Maryland – For the THIRD year in a row, the American Childhood Cancer Organization has been selected as a beneficiary of the Giant Food Community Bag Program for the month of August.

The Giant Food Community Bag Program, which launched in May 2019, is a reusable bag program that facilitates community support with the goal to make a difference in the communities where shoppers live and work.

ACCO was selected as the November beneficiary of the program by store leadership at the Giant Food located at the Beltsville location. ACCO will receive a $1 donation every time the $2.50 reusable Community Bag is purchased at this location during August, unless otherwise directed by the customer through the Giving Tag attached to the bag.

“This is great news, we are honored to be selected as the beneficiary of the Giant Food Community Bag Program. This will directly impact the lives of childhood cancer patients by helping provide crucial resources and advocacy programs to help ACCO further our mission.” said Ruth Hoffman, CEO of ACCO.

Visit the Giant Supermarket locations here:

  • Burtonsville Location: 11701 Beltsville Drive, Beltsville, MD.

The American Childhood Cancer Organization was founded in 1970 by parents of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer. We’re dedicated to making childhood cancer a national health priority through shaping policy, supporting research, raising awareness and providing educational resources and innovative programs for children with cancer, survivors and their families. For more information, please visit www.acco.org/donate

For more information on the Giant Food Community Bag Program, visit giantfood.bags4mycause.com

ACCO’s Distinct Advocacy Program “What About Kids?®” Leads to $25 million in NEW State-based Funding for Childhood Cancer Research!

BELTSVILLE, Md.Dec. 16, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — The American Childhood Cancer Organization announced today that their leadership in 2021 led to $25,000,000 in new state appropriations, transforming childhood cancer research funding. Through Amazon’s support of ACCO’s What About Kids?® Advocacy initiative, ACCO has proven that states play a critical role in overcoming the national disparity between adult and childhood cancer research funding. In addition to the $5 million previously appropriated in Kentucky, ACCO secured an additional $15 million in New Jersey and $10 million in Pennsylvania. The $30 million secured by ACCO across three states for childhood cancer research is equivalent to the annual Federal funding appropriated through the historic Childhood Cancer STAR Act.

Through What About Kids?®, ACCO’s advocacy team worked with legislators to pass Bill 1348 in Pennsylvania. This bill codifies the funding into law as part of the Fiscal Code Bill, Tobacco Settlement Fund. Additionally, they worked with their champions in New Jersey to pass NJ S1431. This establishes the Pediatric Cancer Research Fund which determines how funds are utilized for childhood cancer research within the NJ Comprehensive Cancer Research Program. ACCO is proud to facilitate this $25 million for new childhood cancer research at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of NJ, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Penn State Children’s Hospital, and Abramson at UPENN.

ACCO’s goal is to secure state-based childhood cancer research funding in 25 states by 2030. This target is in line with the World Health Organization’s Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer: to increase global survival to 60% by 2030, thereby saving an additional 1 million children’s lives.

Contact: Aubrey Reichard-Eline, Director of Corporate and Community Partnerships
(908) 403-3232 (cell)
areichard-eline@acco.org

About The American Childhood Cancer Organization

The American Childhood Cancer Organization was founded in 1970 by parents of children diagnosed with cancer. They are dedicated to making childhood cancer a national health priority through shaping policy, expanding research, raising awareness, and providing educational resources and innovative comfort programs for children with cancer, survivors, and their families. Please visit www.acco.org/donate

Gold Ribbon Hero: Violet

Meet Violet, an 11 year old T-Cell ALL warrior! 

“On April 15, 2019, I took Violet to the pediatrician who said it was just a virus. I insisted on bloodwork and another scan. After an ultrasound and bloodwork was done, I barely made it to the parking lot when the pediatrician called to tell me something was wrong with the bloodwork. As soon as we got to the hospital, they hooked her up immediately,” remembers Violet’s mother, Audra. Violet was diagnosed with T-Cell ALL and started her two and a half year treatment of chemotherapy immediately.

On her 9th birthday, her parents noticed something was “off.” Doctors performed scans which revealed fluid and a spot on her brain and Violet went into a comatose state. She was admitted to the PICU and had brain surgery to remove the fluid from her brain. For 24 hours, the family didn’t know if it was an infection or cancer on her brain – it turned out to be an infection. Violet endured two more brain surgeries. She struggled with walking while continuing treatment. She had pancreatitis twice, c diff and an NG tube as well as normal chemotherapy side effects. 

Violet missed her third grade year and spent most of it in the hospital. She was chosen as the True Hero for the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital Gala and was released from the hospital just one day before! As a result of COVID, Violet attended online school for her fourth grade year. In October 2021, Violet completed her treatments and rang the bell. 

During her journey, Violet endured so much and never complained. She stayed positive and has truly become an inspiration to everyone around her. In December 2021, Violet and her family will attend the Indy Fuel Hockey PJammin® game in their pajamas to help raise awareness for childhood cancer. 

Violet had three birthday’s throughout her cancer treatment and a huge chunk of her childhood was robbed. Help give the gift of time to kids like Violet by donating today. 

Learn more about ALL here.

 

Together, we can make a difference.

Donate today… because kids can’t fight cancer alone®.

NOMINATE GRH
Donate to ACCO

Palliative Care for Childhood Cancer

Palliative care is a special type of care aimed at improving quality of life for someone with a life-threatening illness. For children with cancer, this type of care is usually given alongside curative treatment. Palliative care for childhood cancer is a broad term that encompasses many types of care and treatment.

Childhood cancer does not just impact the child’s physical body. It affects their mental and emotional health, development, and relationships with family members and peers. Palliative care aims at addressing the child’s physical, psychological, emotional, social and spiritual needs, as well as those of their family. Since family members and other caregivers have an impact on the child’s health, palliative care for childhood cancer is designed to help them, too. 

Though sometimes the terms are used interchangeably, palliative care and hospice care are not the same. Hospice care is a type of palliative care for someone who is no longer expected to live. Unlike palliative care, which can take place at any time throughout the course of illness, hospice care is reserved for the end of someone’s life.

How does palliative care help children with cancer?

Palliative care is tailored to the individual child’s and family’s wants and needs. Some of the ways palliative care can help children with cancer and their families are:

  • Managing physical symptoms of cancer and its treatment, including pain, itching, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue and more
  • Helping patients and family members cope with stress, fear and anger
  • Helping patients and family members manage psychological problems such as depression and anxiety
  • Helping patients and family members understand cancer, treatment and what the child with cancer is experiencing
  • Offering emotional and spiritual support to children and family members
  • Assisting parents and older patients in making decisions about their treatment and care
  • Helping parents talk to their children about death
  • Providing activities to enhance quality of life, such as music and art therapy
  • Facilitating communication and coordinating treatment among care team members
  • Helping transition the child’s care from hospital to home
  • Providing grief counseling

Who is on the palliative care team for childhood cancer?

Palliative care teams vary between hospitals and institutions, and an individual child’s care team can be as large or as small as their family needs it to be. The palliative care team for children with cancer is made up of specialists trained in supporting children with serious illnesses. They can include:

  • Doctors and nurses
  • Social workers
  • Child life specialists
  • Physical and occupational therapists
  • Psychiatrists, psychologists and counselors
  • Art and music therapists
  • Dietitians and nutritionists
  • Chaplains and spiritual advisors
  • Home health aides

How can parents support their child in palliative care?

Seeing your child sick and in pain is one of the hardest parts of being a parent of a child with cancer. At the American Childhood Cancer Organization, we know that you want to do everything in your power to ease your child’s suffering. As part of our commitment to support families of children with cancer, we offer A Parent’s Guide to Enhancing Quality of Life in Children With Cancer, a 261-page guide available for free in our digital library. You may also request a hard copy as part of our free childhood cancer resources for families, and additional copies can be purchased from our store.

Your child’s palliative care team is there to make them as comfortable as possible during their childhood cancer experience, and they’re there to help you too. By working together, you can provide your child with the support they need no matter where they are in their cancer journey.

The ACCO is the nation’s oldest and largest grassroots childhood cancer organization, committed to shaping policy, supporting research, and providing resources for children with cancer, families and survivors. With your help, we can continue to provide these resources for free. Donate now.

 

Gold Ribbon Hero: Noah E.

Meet Noah, a two year old hepatoblastoma warrior who loves to dance.

When Noah’s stomach looked a bit larger on one side, his mother Nicole began to take notice. Noah was born with a hernia near his belly button, so his family was used to seeing his stomach larger on one side, but eventually it had corrected itself. Doctors didn’t have any causes for concern at that point. Noah went into the doctors for a routine checkup and to get shots. Doctors felt that his liver was a bit too large, so they sent him to the emergency room to have imaging done. 

Noah was admitted to the hospital immediately and his parents were told that he had a mass on his liver. “We were devastated and shocked. The day of his diagnosis was overwhelming. Being that Noah was our first child, we didn’t know how to handle it all. It happened so fast.” 

In February of 2021, Noah was diagnosed with metastatic hepatoblastoma. He was put on an immediate roadmap for treatment including a biopsy, several rounds of chemotherapy and a liver transplant. 

During his journey, “he remains a ball of light. He can brighten anyone’s day. While fighting his battle, he has brought so many people joy just by seeing him run down the hospital halls and hearing his courageous laugh.” 

Currently, Noah is completing his end of treatment and looks forward to playing with his little brother. 

 

 

 

Kids like Noah shouldn’t have to trade learning his ABC’s and making new friends for chemo and surgery. ACCO wants to give these kids back their time. Give the gift of time by donating today: http://give.acco.org/GiftOfTime  

ACCO Celebrates Year TWO with Giant in the Community Bag Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Burtonsville, Maryland – For the SECOND year in a row, the American Childhood Cancer Organization has been selected as a beneficiary of the Giant Food Community Bag Program for the month of August.

The Giant Food Community Bag Program, which launched in May 2019, is a reusable bag program that facilitates community support with the goal to make a difference in the communities where shoppers live and work.

ACCO was selected as the November beneficiary of the program by store leadership at the Giant Food located at the Burtonsville location. ACCO will receive a $1 donation every time the $2.50 reusable Community Bag is purchased at this location during August, unless otherwise directed by the customer through the Giving Tag attached to the bag.

“This is great news, we are honored to be selected as the beneficiary of the Giant Food Community Bag Program. This will directly impact the lives of childhood cancer patients by helping provide crucial resources and advocacy programs to help ACCO further our mission.” said Ruth Hoffman, CEO of ACCO.

Visit the Giant Supermarket locations here:

  • Burtonsville Location: 15618 Old Columbia Pk, Burtonsville MD.

The American Childhood Cancer Organization was founded in 1970 by parents of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer. We’re dedicated to making childhood cancer a national health priority through shaping policy, supporting research, raising awareness and providing educational resources and innovative programs for children with cancer, survivors and their families. For more information, please visit www.acco.org/donate

For more information on the Giant Food Community Bag Program, visit giantfood.bags4mycause.com

ACCO Aims to ‘Give the Gift of Time’ with Their Dual Giving Tuesday Campaign

BELTSVILLE, Md.Oct. 20, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — First comes Black Friday, then Cyber Monday. Then it’s Giving Tuesday, the day recognised around the world when people give back. ACCO launched the campaign in early October and asked the community to donate to ‘Give the Gift of Time,’ the 2021 Giving Tuesday campaign. Approximately one in 285 children will be diagnosed with cancer before their 20th birthday.

Through the generosity of donors, kids will be given more time: whether it’s with their families, outside the hospital and time on this earth. It grants them bike rides, another first day of school and many more birthdays.

How You Can Help

New to 2021, ACCO empowered the community to donate in one of two ways. Aside from traditional donations, ACCO empowers the community to start their own fundraising teams in an effort to double their giving power. Together, the community will make a difference.

Under the new teams, fundraisers can raise money for specific causes within ACCO.

  • For a donation of $100, donors support essential resources like informational books and much-needed answers to parents.
  • For a $500 donation, specialized tools can be provided for kids with cancer and their families.
  • For a $1,000 donation, ACCO is able to expand advocacy efforts to make this health crisis a national priority.
  • Through ACCO’s advocacy programs, a $5,000 donation can multiply by a hundredfold resulting in $500,000 state-guaranteed funds for childhood cancer research.

Time is the most precious thing we have with our loved ones, and this Giving Tuesday, ACCO asks to ‘Give the Gift of Time.’

About The American Childhood Cancer Organization

The American Childhood Cancer Organization was founded in 1970 by parents of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer. We’re dedicated to making childhood cancer a national child health priority through shaping policy, supporting research, raising awareness and providing educational resources and innovative programs for children with cancer, survivors and their families. For more information, please visit www.acco.org/donate

Contact: Blair L. Scroggs, Public Relations Coordinator
(301) 751-4142 (cell)
bscroggs@acco.org

Gold Ribbon Hero: Trevor

Trevor is a 15 year old two time medulloblastoma warrior who loves to travel and experience new adventures with his family.

 When Trevor was first diagnosed, he was experiencing dizziness, nausea and seizure-like episodes. In November 2016, Trevor’s brain was hemisected to remove the fist-size tumor. Within days, he was released home for rehab, chemotherapy and radiation. In July 2020, Trevor’s team discovered another tumor and started treatment immediately. 

Michelle, Trevor’s mother said, “Trevor is THE MAN! He’s a hero because he perseveres in the face of monumental circumstances. Trevor’s body betrays him with chemotherapy and wipes out not just an immune system, but stamina too. He has to do double and triple duty all the time and he does it with a cheerful attitude and a pleasant, upbeat and hopeful anticipation of all things working out for good.” 

Time is the most precious thing we have with our loved ones and this Giving Tuesday, we ask that you give the gift of time. Whether it’s funding research, raising awareness, empowering or supporting kids with cancer your gift will help secure more time for cancer’s littlest patients.

In addition to traditional donations, this Giving Tuesday, you can form teams to fundraise together. Share your links on social media or through text to increase ACCO’s funding of childhood cancer research… because kids can’t fight cancer alone!®

Donate today to increase ACCO’s funding of childhood cancer research.

Trevor was also pictured in our “What About Kids?™”  campaign in September 2021

Down Syndrome and Leukemia

Each year, about 6,000 children in the United States are born with Down syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, a condition where they have an extra copy of their 21st chromosome. The extra chromosome causes delays in their mental and physical development and makes them more susceptible to certain health issues, including problems with their heart, lungs, vision and hearing. It also makes them more likely to develop certain diseases, like childhood leukemia.

Is leukemia common in Down syndrome?

Leukemia is still considered rare in children with Down syndrome, but they are more likely to develop leukemia than other children. One large-scale 2021 study found that 2.8% of children  with Down syndrome had leukemia, compared with only 0.05% of other children. In particular, children with Down syndrome are 150 times more likely than other children to develop acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, before age 5. The study also found that children with Down syndrome were more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL, at any age. 

How is Down syndrome related to leukemia?

For many years, scientists didn’t know why so many more children with Down syndrome developed leukemia. But this year, researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome discovered that it could have something to do with their stem cells.

Stem cells are special cells that replicate themselves and can develop into different types of cells. What the researchers found is that children with Down syndrome are more likely to have clonal hematopoiesis (CH), a condition where blood stem cells develop a mutation and then continue to replicate, leading to a buildup of mutated blood cells.

Some people with CH can be healthy and have no symptoms. But in others, CH can lead to blood cancers, especially AML.

Prognosis and Treatment for Children with Down Syndrome and Leukemia

In particular, children with Down syndrome tend to develop a subtype of AML called acute megakaryocytic leukemia, or AMKL. This subtype is very rare among other children and can be very difficult to treat, but children with Down syndrome and AMKL typically respond well to treatment. It’s believed that the very mutation that makes children with Down syndrome more likely to develop AMKL actually makes their cancers more susceptible to treatment. 

All children with leukemia are treated with some combination of chemotherapy. However, children with Down syndrome tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, so their doctors will adjust their treatment to reduce the toxicity while maintaining its effectiveness.

Overall, 80% of children with Down syndrome and leukemia will survive. A child’s survival depends on many factors, however, so it’s important for parents to discuss their individual child’s prognosis with their doctor.

The American Childhood Cancer Organization is the nation’s oldest and largest grassroots organization dedicated to childhood cancer. We shape policy, raise awareness, and offer educational resources to children with cancer, survivors, and their families. With your help, we can continue to provide our support free of charge. Donate now.

Donate to ACCO

 

 

Learn more about childhood leukemia:

Amazon + ACCO Ambassador: Sofia

Meet Sofia, 2021 Amazon + ACCO ambassador. Sofia is a 7 year old acute lymphoblastic leukemia warrior who loves cooking.

When Sofia was initially diagnosed, she had chronic fevers, was very tired and had petechiae inside her lip. Once she was in the hospital, they drew blood and had the results. “They pulled my husband and me out of the room. At that moment we knew it was bad news. The doctor gave us the diagnosis and we were devastated,” remembers Alicia, Sofia’s mother. Treatment started immediately and will last a little over a year.   

“Sofia is definitely a hero because she has remained strong on this journey. Every time there has been a hospital stay or clinic visit, she always asks what medicine they are giving her and for what reason which is a great quality to have. Her doctors and nurses constantly tell me how calm she is and that she is a great patient.”

ACCO works tirelessly to identify and reduce the disparity between adult and childhood cancer research and treatment. We must continue to ask, “What About Kids?™”  Together, we can make childhood cancer a state health priority in funding and policies for kids fighting cancer and long-term childhood cancer survivors.

This Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, donate today…because kids can’t fight cancer alone!®: https://give.acco.org/ChildhoodCancerAwarenessMonth2021